Practise
Video

Tour Sticks - The Ultimate Practice Guide.

6 Modules 50 Lessons Easy

About this course

Learning how to practice effectively can be a daunting task. The introduction and use of tour sticks can be quite confusing. This Course is custom designed for the everyday golfer who loves to practice.

Course Structure

SUBSCRIBERS
9 Lessons

POWER DRILLS

EXTENSION

Extension - Power Drill

Objective:


To improve width and extension after impact and reduce the ‘chicken wing’ effect.
We use the Tour Stick as an incentive to adjust the position of the club in the through the swing.

Setup:


Push a Tour Stick in the ground, positioned outside of your through the swing.
Angle the Stick away from you.

Safety:


The Tour Stick should be out of reach of your swing. Contact with the Stick is not necessary.
For added safety, slide a pool noodle over the Tour Stick.

Process:


Start with practice swings and then slowly graduate to hitting full shots.
The intention is to clip the Tour Stick with your clubhead in the through the swing.
Although the Stick is actually out of reach, the intention promotes extended arms and club.
For full extension, a certain amount of hip and trunk rotation towards the target is required.

Keep in Mind:


This extension is a position in motion. You should complete the follow through to a full finish.

SPEED STICK

Objective:

Setup:

Safety:

Process:

Keep in Mind:

TURN ENFORCER

Objective:

Setup:

Safety:

Process:

Keep in Mind:

TUSH LINE

Objective:

Setup:

Safety:

Process:

Keep in Mind:

BACKSWING LOADER

Backswing Loader - Power Drill

Objective:


To build a stable platform in the backswing and store optimum energy.
By turning and ‘sinking’ into the trail hip, you activate the glutes and store energy in the backswing. From this strong position, you are ready to turn explosively forward into the downswing.

Setup:


Push a Tour Stick firmly into the ground, vertically behind your trail pocket (R rear pocket for right-handers). Address the golf ball, with your back pocket lightly touching the Stick.

Safety:


No issues.

Process:


As you turn into the backswing, your trail pocket moves backwards, pushing and bending the Tour Stick back.

Keep in Mind:


The Tour Stick needs to be firmly in the ground. Use 2 Sticks together if you can’t feel the one behind you.

FULL TURN

Full Turn - Power Drill

Objective:


A great drill which utilises the Tour Sticks for a very visual representation of the turn into the backswing. To create a powerful position in the backswing, the shoulders should ideally turn behind the golf ball and over the laces of the trail shoe.

Setup:


No clubs required for this one, so great for at home.
Hold a Tour Stick across the front of your shoulders, crossing your arms.
Stand to the golf ball, assuming your normal posture.

Safety:


No issues

Process:


Turn into your backswing, continuing to hold the Tour Stick to your shoulders.
Depending on your level of flexibility, the Stick should ideally point towards the ground, behind the golf ball. This point indicates a Full Turn at the top of the backswing.
If you can’t turn enough to position the Tour Stick behind the ball, be patient. Each time you try this motion, your flexibility can improve.
You can allow your hips to turn a little more and the heel of your front shoe can also come off the ground, to achieve more rotation in the backswing.
You should feel pressure on the inside of your trail foot.

Keep in Mind:


It is possible to over-rotate too, with the Stick pointing too far behind the golf ball. About 50cm behind the ball should be your maximum turn.

KNEE STABILISER

Knee Stabiliser - Power Drill

Objective:


This Power Drill is designed to create more space through impact as well as more ground force energy.
It’s for the golfer who’s trail leg tends to ‘pop’ forward towards the golf ball in the downswing, as the hips turn towards the target. This forward knee movement is an indication of ‘early extension’.
As long as the Tour Stick is firmly in the ground, any contact between the knee and the Stick can be felt, providing valuable feedback.

Setup:


Push the Tour Stick deeply into the ground, behind you on the trailside. The tip of the Stick should be positioned immediately in front of your trail knee.

Safety:


Ensure that the Tour Stick is low enough and right in front of your trail knee. This is to avoid the possibility of hitting the Stick with your hands or club in the downswing.

Process:


As always, start with practice swings, making sure not to touch the Tour Stick with your trail knee.
Ideally, as you turn through and onto your front foot in the downswing, your trail knee will straighten slightly and move away from the golf ball, not towards it.

Keep in Mind:


The Tour Stick needs to be positioned exactly, with the tip no higher than your knee.
There should be no space between the Stick and your back knee.

HIP ROTATION

Hip Rotation - Power Drill

Objective:


This drill is for players who would like to increase their hip turn in the throughswing.
To activate the lower half of the body at the transition into the downswing.
By accelerating the forward rotation of the legs and hips earlier in the downswing, you are capable of generating more clubhead speed and improving lag in to the hitting zone.

Setup:


Push a Tour Stick into the ground behind you on your forward (target) side. Angle the Stick away from you. Slide a pool noodle over the top of the Stick.
Slide the 2nd Tour Stick through your belt loops, all the way to your forward side. No part of the Stick will be protruding from your belt on your trail side.
As you address the ball, you should be able to turn your hips toward the target approximately 20°-30° before your belted Stick touches the pool noodle.

Safety:


This quite ‘aggressive’ rotation of hips can place a strain on your lower back, if you have limited hip or thoracic mobility. Consult your health care professional if you are in any doubt of your flexibility for this motion.
If any part of the Tour Stick protrudes from your belt loops on your trail side, you could hit the Stick with your hands or club in the downswing.
Be sure to angle the grounded Stick away from you, so that your belted Stick will glance off the pool noodle.

Process:


Beginning with practice swings, as you transition into the downswing, turn your hips towards the target early.
Try to touch the pool noodle with your belted Tour Stick before you brush the grass.
Think of the drill as a race, between your hips and your clubhead.
After some practice, graduate to hitting the golf ball in slow motion. Again, trying to contact the pool noodle before you strike the golf ball.
Listen for the contact with the pool noodle. You might need to set up a video camera to see which apparatus won the ‘race’.
Move the position of the ball to adjust the difficulty level of the drill. It should be challenging but possible.

Keep in Mind:


Some golfers turn forward well but tilt the hips so much that the belted stick lifts over the pool noodle. A Tour Stick alone without the noodle is generally not tall enough.

ISOLATION

Isolation - Power Drill

Objective:


To activate and Isolate the muscles of the lower half of the body from the upper half.
This exercise trains the mind and body to be able to initiate the transition into the downswing with the legs and glutes.

Setup:


No clubs required for this drill. Slide a Tour Stick through your front belt loops, with the stick evenly balanced through your left and right sides.
Hold the other Stick up to the front of your shoulders, crossing your arms.
Address the golf ball in your normal posture, for a 6-iron, still holding the 2nd Stick across your shoulders.

Safety:


No issues

Process:


Slowly turn the belted Tour Stick left and right, as they ideally would for a short shot, such as a pitch shot. Continuously turn the hips left and right.
However, the tricky aspect is, you need to keep the Stick which is across your shoulders, dead still!
This challenging movement teaches you how to Isolate those leg and gluteus muscles from the trunk and shoulders.
This motion mimics the ideal lower half movement of your body at the start of the downswing.
For a completely different challenge, now try to keep your belted Tour Stick stable, whilst turning your shoulders and the higher Stick backwards and forwards. This alternate exercise is great for promoting a stable lower half for putts and short chips.
This one is a bit easier.

Keep in Mind:


Most people find the first drill incredibly difficult to achieve at first but with practice, you’ll improve.

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PERFECT PACE

Perfect Pace - Putting Drill

Objective:


To improve distance control for putting.
This drill is a challenge and is designed to be competitive, with an actual score. This type of practice is invaluable for preparing players for the golf course and for putting under pressure.

Setup:


Choose a section of green for some uphill putts to the hole, with little break. You’ll need around 10 metres (30 feet) of space.
Place 5 golf balls in a line to the hole, 2 metres (7 feet) apart.
Place a Tour Stick on the ground 90cm (3 feet) behind the hole, across the line of play.

Safety:


No issues

Process:


Begin with the ball closest to the hole and try to sink the 2 metre putt.
If you hole the putt, you score 2 points. If you miss but the speed of the putt is good, you score 1 point.
If you miss and the speed of your putt is poor, o points are scored.
For clarity, good speed on a missed putt is rolling past the hole (not just up to it) but not reaching the Tour Stick beyond the cup. Ideal holing speed is around 43cm (17 inches) past the hole, depending on the speed of the green.
Continue with the remaining putts, from 4, 6, 8 and 10 metres. Attempt to sink each putt, remembering your score as you proceed.
Repeat the drill with 5 downhill putts.
You now have a score out of a possible 20 points.
Record your score in a practice book or on your smart phone.
Repeat at your next practice session, doing your best to beat your highest score.

Keep in Mind:


Don’t start again if you’re off to a shaky start. Every putt should count
Although this is primarily a speed control drill, get into the habit of actually trying to and believing you can sink each putt.
Many golfers are content to leave a long putt just short of the cup. However, this is not a ‘lag’ drill but an excellent way to create the good habit of stroking putts at holing speed.
No points for lagging with this drill!

PUTTING TEMPO

Putting Tempo - Putting Drill

Objective:


To improve Putting Tempo and distance control.
This putting routine is an exercise in balancing the length of the backswing and followthrough.
Many golfers’ putting strokes are imbalanced, with either a short backswing with a longer followthrough or a long backswing with a shorter followthrough.
This drill balances the swing, creating a pendulum action and eliminating deceleration and over acceleration.

Setup:


Mark lines on a Tour Stick with a permanent marker, evenly spaced apart. For this drill, we marked the Stick at every 10cm (4 inches).
Choose a section of the practice green with a slight gradient to left or right. Place the Tour Stick on the green, parallel to the intended putt. No hole is required for this drill.
Push a tee into the green adjacent to the very centre of the Stick. Push more tees into the green, next to the marks you have made. Ideally use coloured tees that match the mark at the other end of the stick. E.g. blue tees 10cm from the centre of the Stick, yellow tees 20cm from the centre, etc.
Setup as if to putt, with the face of your putter exactly opposite the middle tee.

Safety:


Stand and stretch your back every 4-5 putts. Bending over putts for extended periods of time places quite a strain on the back and your posture.
If you intend to practise your putting at length, from the one spot, spread a towel on the green under your shoes, to protect the putting surface.

Process:


Take a practice stroke back and through, making sure that the backswing and followthrough are exactly the same length. If you’ve set the drill up correctly, you can use the colours of the tees as a guide - swing back to blue, through to blue; swing back to yellow, through to yellow, etc.
This exercise is building a pendulum action and promoting a more consistent, constant speed through the impact area.
Next try it with golf balls. Notice how far each putt rolls. The longer the stroke, the further the ball rolls.
Avoid changing the effort or tension levels from putt to putt. The only aspect that changes the speed of each putt, is the length of the stroke.

Keep in Mind:


The face of the putter and not the golf ball, should be set up adjacent to the centre of the Tour Stick.
Ideally, the putts should swing left or right, to make way for the next putt.

ZERO LINE

Zero Line - Putting Drill

Objective:


To enhance a golfer’s green reading skills.
This setup provides the ideal visual representation of the tilt of the putting surface.
This drill coaches a player on how to identify the Zero Line and then understand how the forces of gravity affect the direction a putt breaks and how much a putt curves.
This understanding is the basis of all green reading and helps with confidence on the greens.

Setup:


You need 2 Tour Sticks and several golf balls for this exercise.
Find a golf hole, with a putting surface that has some tilt to it.

Safety:


No issues

Process:


Your challenge is to place the Tour Sticks around the cup on the Zero Line. The Zero Line is the line of putt, which has zero break.
If placed correctly, each Tour Stick will be placed on the ground on opposite sides of the hole. One Stick will be pointing to the hole downhill, the other below the cup, pointing uphill.
Test how accurately you have placed the Tour Sticks by trying to hole some putts to the hole from several different points around the cup. Don’t putt from more than about 3 metres (10 feet) away.
Take notice of which way each putt swings and by how much.
Adjust the Sticks where necessary, so that they are in perfect position, on the Zero Line.
Now stand below the hole, from behind the low Tour Stick and look up towards the cup. You should be aware that all putts from the left side of the Tour Sticks swung right and all putts from the right of the Sticks broke left.
You should also notice that downhill putts tend to break more than uphill putts. However, the putts that curved the most, were the ones from directly across the Zero Line.
See how important it is to identify the Zero Line around a hole, to understand green reading and to correctly predict how much any given putt should break?

Keep in Mind:


Putting surfaces can be irregular and less than perfect.
Therefore, locating the Zero Line is always a challenge and the Tour Sticks won’t always line up directly opposite each other when performing this drill.

STRAIGHT BACK & THRU

Straight Back & Thru - Putting Drill

Objective:


To improve alignment and the mechanics of the putting stroke. This drill is for players who employ a ‘Straight Back & Thru’ putting stroke, with the putter travelling straight back from the golf ball on the target line and straight through towards the target.

Setup:


Choose a straight putt of around 5-6 feet.
Place 2 Tour Sticks approximately 15cm (6 inches) apart, aligned perfectly straight to the cup. The Sticks should be wide enough to allow 1cm each side of your putter.
The Tour Sticks help the golfer set up squarely to the target and gives a visual reference for the putting stroke.

Safety:


Stand and stretch your back every 4-5 putts. Bending over putts for extended periods of time places quite a strain on the back and your posture.
If you intend to practise your putting at length, from the one spot, spread a towel on the green under your shoes, to protect the putting surface.

Process:


The hole as many putts in a row as you can, putting from between the Tour Sticks. Ensure your putter is perfectly square to the Stick, even if you feel that you are misaligned to the target.
The putter should swing ‘Straight Back & Thru’ both in the backswing and followthrough. The putter should remain perfectly square to the target for the entire putting stroke.
At no point during the stroke, should the putter touch either Tour Stick or even swing over the Sticks.

Keep in Mind:


The putt should be dead straight! The Tour Sticks needs to be aligned perfectly parallel to the putt.

ARC PUTTING

Arc Putting - Putting Drill

Objective:


To improve alignment and the mechanics of the putting stroke. This drill is for players who employ an ‘Arc’ putting stroke, with the putter travelling slightly inside the target line during both the backswing and followthrough.

Setup:


Choose a straight putt of around 5-6 feet. Place a Tour Stick outside the golf ball, aligned to just outside the cup.
The Stick helps the golfer setup squarely to the target and gives a visual reference for the putting stroke.

Safety:


Stand and stretch your back every 4-5 putts. Bending over putts for extended periods of time places quite a strain on the back and your posture.
If you intend to practise your putting at length, from the one spot, spread a towel on the green under your shoes, to protect the putting surface.

Process:


Hole as many putts in a row as you can, putting alongside the Tour Stick. Ensure your putter is perfectly square to the Stick, even if you feel that you are misaligned to the target.
The putter should ‘Arc’ inwards in both the backswing and through swing and should never swing towards or over the Tour Stick.

Keep in Mind:


The putt should be dead straight! The Tour Stick needs to be aligned perfectly parallel to the putt.

GREEN READING

Green Reading - Putting Drill

Objective:


To help you understand how a green is designed and how to prepare for putting in the future.
Most golfers play the same golf course most weekends and make the same green reading mistakes every time. Take a leaf out of the Tour Professionals’ handbook and spend some time planning and understanding your greens. You’ll save yourself much time and many strokes in the long run.

Setup:


No clubs required! Just a few golf balls and two Tour Sticks. Begin by locating the edge of the green, where you believe the highest point of the green is.
Place 2 Tour Sticks on the ground, parallel to each other, approximately 2cm (3/4 inch) apart.
Lift one end of the Sticks 30cm (1 foot) off the ground, pointing the other ends to the middle of the green.
Optional - Download and print an image of the green you are ‘mapping’ from Google Earth.

Safety:


Other golfers might think you’re mad!

Process:


Release a golf ball from the top of the Tour Sticks, allowing the ball to roll down the groove created by the Sticks.
Study the roll and swing of the ball as it continues down the slope of the green (assuming you successfully found the high point).
Roll several balls across the green, from different points, taking note of the way the balls react to the slope of the green.
Keep going until you are confident that you have found the straightest downhill putt through the centre of the green. This is generally to a point where excess water would run off the green.
Mark a long arrow on your printout of the green, indicating this line of a downhill putt with little to no break.

Keep in Mind:


Not every green has just the single tilt to its design.
You might decide to mark 2, 3 or more arrows on your chart, dividing the green into separate sections, depending upon its layout.
On slow greens, lift the Tour Sticks higher for more roll.

PUTTING GATE

Putting Gate - Putting Drill

Objective:


To improve putter alignment and stroke mechanics.
This Putting drill is ideal for the player who tends to push and pull putts.
Using the Tour Sticks as a Gate Drill, we help the golfer focus on rolling the golf ball over an intermediate target, without being overly distracted by the hole or the break.
Many golfers tend to under read putts and then push or pull them online. This setup eliminates this tendency and encourages the player to start the ball on the intended line.

Setup:


Choose a lengthy putt with some break to it.
Push the 2 Tour Sticks vertically into the green, about 60cm (2 feet) from the ball, along the intended line of the putt. There should be a small gap between the Sticks, of approximately 6cm (2.5 inches).

Safety:


Stand and stretch your back every 4-5 putts. Bending over putts for extended periods of time places quite a strain on the back and your posture.
If you intend to practise your putting at length, from the one spot, spread a towel on the green under your shoes, to protect the putting surface.

Process:


Hit the putt several times, attempting to roll the ball through the Putting Gate and then into the hole.
You will likely need to adjust the position you are putting from, as you learn the correct speed and the appropriate amount of break. This is a great green reading exercise too.
Change it up by varying the length of the putt, the amount of break and the direction of the slope.

Keep in Mind:


This drill might look easy but it is very challenging. We’re breaking bad habits performing this activity and that takes time.

ROCK THE SHOULDERS

Rock The Shoulders - Putting Drill

Objective:


To simplify putting stroke mechanics and help create a pendulum action.
This drill helps the golfer quieten the hands, wrists and legs, for a more consistent arms and shoulders action.
The Tour Stick provides and External Focus of Attention and thus, is very effective in smoothing the putting stroke and simplifying putting mechanics.

Setup:


Choose a putt of any length.
Slide a Tour Stick under both arms and across your chest. Push the Stick up as high under your armpits as you can.
Address the ball normally.

Safety:


The Tour Stick will dig into some parts of your chest and arms, so will feel a little uncomfortable.

Process:


Beginning without the golf ball, make some putting strokes, with the Tour Stick in place under the arms.
Focus on the action of the Stick, rocking backwards and forwards as you swing. The Tour Stick should tilt the same amount for the backswing and the throughswing.
Try to isolate this motion, so that nothing else is moving, including your legs, hips, hands and wrists.
Now, try the same motion, putting the golf ball.

Keep in Mind:


Setting up for this drill will be more difficult for those golfers with larger arms and chest.

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SWING BALANCER

Swing Balancer - Short Game Drill

Objective:


To improve tempo for chipping and pitching, thereby enhancing distance control.
This drill is for the player who decelerates or over-accelerates on these short shots.
Golfers who have a short backswing and longer followthrough tend to produce a lifting, scooping motion and often struggle with clean contact.
Alternatively, some golfers employ a very long backswing and ‘quit’ on their shots.
This setup utilises the Tour Sticks as Barriers, providing quality feedback on the length of the swing.

Setup:


For Chipping - Push the Tour Sticks into the ground behind you, about 2 metres (7 feet) apart. One Stick is to limit your backswing, the other to limit your followthrough.
Angle the Tour Sticks forward so that both Sticks will be in the path of your swing with the club, not your arms.
For Pitching - Move the Sticks further behind you. Slide pool noodles over both Tour Sticks for added height and to allow for a slightly longer swing.

Safety:


This drill is designed exclusively for short game shots. Due to the longer swing, it is not suitable for full shots.
Place the Tour Sticks far enough away, that only your club can reach them during your swing. They should be out of reach of your hands and arms.

Process:


Beginning without the golf ball, make some chipping swings.
Swing the club back far enough to lightly touch the Tour Stick behind you. Then swing through in the same manner, stopping at the 2nd Stick in your followthrough.
Touch both Tour Sticks repeatedly, using the feedback to develop a more Balanced Swing. The goal is to become comfortable with swinging with the backswing and throughswing the same length.
Next try the exercise with an actual chip. This time, try to avoid touching the Sticks.
Repeat several times, creating the new, beneficial habit of balancing the backswing and followthrough.

Keep in Mind:


You may need added feedback from a friend or video, to see how short of each Tour Stick you are swinging.
It’s not important how far short of the Sticks you are, just that both sides of your chipping and pitching swings are even.

SHALLOW CHIP

Shallow Chip - Short Game Drill

Objective:


To shallow the path of the clubhead during the chipping action. This drill is ideal for the player who tends to be steep with the chipping action and takes divots.
The Tour Stick acts as a Barrier, promoting a lower backswing and downswing.
This is a great tool for coping with soft, wet ground conditions. The golfer will tend to brush the grass under the golf ball, rather than dig in and take a divot.

Setup:


Push a Tour Stick into the ground, perpendicular to the target, at an extremely low angle. The top of the Stick should only be about 10cm (4 inches) above the ground.
The strike zone will be about 30cm (1 foot) forward of the top end of the Stick. The Tour Stick acts as a Barrier for the clubhead in the backswing and downswing.

Safety:


Only attempt this drill with chip shots. It is not suitable for longer shots, due to the close proximity of the Tour Stick.
You can slide a section of pool noodle over the top of the Stick for added safety.

Process:


You can use any wedge for this drill.
Begin without the ball. Try to brush the grass with your clubhead, about 30cm after the tip of the Tour Stick.
The idea is that your clubhead swings underneath the tip of the Stick in both the backswing and downswing.
Positioning is key. If you are standing too close to the Tour Stick, you may hit it with the hosel of your wedge. Stand too far away and the Stick loses its effectiveness.
Now place the golf ball where you have been brushing the grass. Again, keep the wedge low to the ground, to pass under the Tour Stick.
If you touch the Stick with your wedge, stop and try again. If you’re still stabbing into the ground or taking divots, lower the Tour Stick some more.

Keep in Mind:


You may brush the grass behind the ball until you become used to this exercise. It’s important to practise without the ball first, to be set up correctly for the drill.

WRIST STABILISER

Wrist Stabiliser - Short Game Drill

Objective:


As the name suggests, the goal is to Stabilise the Wrists and thereby the clubface for chip and pitch shots.
This drill is for the golfer who has a habit of collapsing the wrists through the chip and into the followthrough. This collapse promotes a scooping motion through impact, often causing mishits, such as heavy and bladed chip shots.
This issue is also characterised by little forward body rotation and a longer followthrough, with the shaft of the club heading skywards.
The goal is for the player to turn the torso through to the target and hold the finish position. Ideally, the lead arm and club shaft should form a fairly straight line in the followthrough and the clubface will stay square (point upwards).

Setup:


Use a short iron or wedge.
Hold the Tour Stick together with the grip, so that it is underneath the grip and shaft.
If you have an old practice club, you can push the sharp end of the Stick into the top of the grip and down the inside of the club shaft.
Address the golf ball, so that the Stick is running up your body on the lead side. You may need to push your grip forward of the ball more than normal.

Safety:


Never hit shots longer than with a half swing, whilst holding the Tour Stick.
As you release the club through the impact area, you will strike yourself in the side with the Tour Stick.
This drill is only suitable for chipping and pitching.

Process:


Beginning without the golf ball, take some short practice swings.
Each followthrough should be approximately the same length and the backswing. Hold the finish position for a few seconds and check the position of the torso and the relationship between the arms and club.


Ask yourself:


1. Is your chest turned through to the target?
2. Is your lead wrist flat?
3. Have you avoided ‘whacking’ yourself with the Tour Stick?
4. Is the shaft an extension of your lead arm?
You need to be able to answer all of these questions in the affirmative.
Continue until you can, then you can introduce the golf ball.
Repeat the process, now playing chip shots, always holding the finish and checking the followthrough.
Progress to pitch shots only when you feel you can safely, without the danger of hitting yourself with the Tour Stick.

Keep in Mind:


The ball flight will be a little lower than normal because of the placement of the Tour Stick. The hands and shaft have been forced forward at address, thereby delofting the club.
You can return to setting up with just slight forward shaft lean, once you have mastered the drill.

OPEN FACE

Open Face - Short Game Drill

Objective:


To help golfers become more comfortable with opening the clubface, specifically for shots around the green.
This drill uses the Tour Sticks to provide some guidelines in the setup, on how to address the golf ball to play this high, soft-landing shot.

Setup:


We use 2 Tour Sticks and a lofted wedge for this short game drill.
The first is placed between your feet and the golf ball, aligned for an open stance. This Stick aims left of the target for right-handers and right of the target for left-handers. Your feet and body will be aligned parallel to this 1st Stick for the drill.
Start with just a few degrees open to start with, increasing to a maximum of around 20° later.
The 2nd Tour Stick is placed outside the golf ball, this time almost perpendicular to the ball-to-target line.
This 2nd Stick is for the leading edge of the clubface, which should be setup behind the golf ball, in line with this 2nd Stick.
We say almost perpendicular because we also want the clubface slightly open - aimed to the right for the right-hander, to the left for left-handers. Adjust the placement of the Stick accordingly.

Safety:


Ensure that both Tour Sticks are far enough away from the golf ball, as not to risk hitting them.
Playing shots with an open clubface does increase the chance of hitting that dreaded ‘blade’ shot across the green. Do not attempt this shot if there are people of property within range of the thinned shot.

Process:


Setup is key. Make sure your feet and body are ‘open’ to the target and even more importantly, lay your clubface open as well.
Hit the pitch, swinging the club along the 1st Tour Stick, out-to-in across the target line.
The clubface must remain open throughout the shot, to play the high shot we this drill is intended to create. As the ball will fly higher, a longer swing than normal is required.

Keep in Mind:


Open means different things, depending on what you’re referring to.
For right-handers:
Open clubface means aiming right of the target.
Open stance means aligned left of the target.
For left-handers:
Open clubface means aiming left of the target.
Open stance means aligned right of the target.

LOB

Lob - Short Game Drill

Objective:


To improve touch and control for those delicate Short Game Shots.
To train the golfer to launch the golf ball high, without hitting the Lob too far, a common error for this shot.
This drill employs an External Focus Of Attention to develop higher skill levels when playing this delicate shot.

Setup:


Begin on a small section of grass, with no green.
Push a Tour Stick vertically into the ground, about 2 metres (7 feet) away from the ball.
Place the ball on a ‘good lie’. Use a sand wedge of lob wedge for this shot.
Slide a pool noodle over the Tour Stick to increase the level of difficulty.

Safety:


Ensure that no person or property is in front of you and in danger of being struck by a golf ball.
Be aware that you will probably ‘blade’ some of these shots in an effort to achieve more height and spin. These ‘thinned’ shots can travel at a much faster speed than expected.

Process:


Play the lob shot, hitting the ball over the stick with little speed. Attempt to land the ball as close as you can on the other side of the Tour Stick.
Repeat, constantly trying to improve upon your best Lob. The shorter you can hit the shot, while still flying the ball over the Stick, the more feel you’ll gain.
Experiment with an open clubface and the dynamic loft (shaft lean).
You can change it up by moving closer or further away from the Tour Stick.
When you feel ready, you can graduate to playing the lob onto the green, incorporating the challenge of reducing the amount of roll on the green. Always be sure to expect the odd ‘bladed’ shot, which rockets over the green.

Keep in Mind:


This is a high-risk shot to take onto the golf course, so plenty of practice is required.
We encourage to try this drill, even if you don’t intend to attempt it on during a round, as it does wonders for enhancing feel and clubface awareness.

LANDING POINT

Landing Point - Short Game Drill

Objective:


To improve the golfer’s ability to land a chip of pitch on a specific target.
This drill employs a purely External Focus of Attention to enhance feel and distance control around the greens.
By studying the golf ball’s action on the green and the roll out, club selection can be based on experience, rather than guesswork.

Setup:


Place the 2 Tour Sticks on the green, near your closest fringe, about 1 metre (3 feet) apart. They will be parallel to each other and perpendicular to the golf ball’s direction of flight.
Drop a few golf balls in different lies off the green.

Safety:


Ensure that no one is in front of you and in danger of being hit by a golf ball.

Process:


Chip the golf ball, with any lofted club of your choice, attempting to land each shot between the 2 Tour Sticks.
Study the behaviour of each shot upon landing, especially taking note of how far the balls roll after landing.
Change clubs and the distance between you and the Landing Point regularly. This helps gain a sense of understanding how far to expect each chip will roll.
Introduce a flag as an end target and change clubs depending on how far you need to carry the ball to find the Landing Point.
The closer you are to the Landing Point, the less loft you’ll need. The further away you are, the more loft you’ll need.
Discover that each chip shot has a specific ratio of flight distance to rolling distance.

Keep in Mind:


The distance each shot rolls isn’t just dependent upon the loft of the club used.
Other factors include the lie, quality of strike, dynamic loft (amount of shaft lean), gradients both on and off the green, moisture level and speed of the green.

CONNECTION

Connection - Short Game Drill

Objective:


To develop a chipping and pitching action, which connects the hips, trunk and arms.
Many golfers are ‘out of sync’, with the arms disconnected from the body. Quite often, players hardly turn at all when playing these shorter shots.
This drill helps activate that rotation.

Setup:


Slide a Tour Stick through your 2 front belt loops, with the Stick balanced evenly on each side.
You can use the 2nd Stick as a simple alignment aid.
Address the chip or pitch in the normal way.

Safety:


Start with short chips, as there might be some contact with the Tour Stick until your Connection improves.
Do not attempt full swings with the Stick in this position.

Process:


Play the shot, ensuring you turn through to the target with your whole body.
Maintain a consistent relationship between the hips, trunk, arms and club.
The goal is to turn connected, so you don’t touch the Tour Stick.

Keep in Mind:


This motion is different to the full swing. The hips would turn earlier in the downswing for more power and shaft lag.
For a similar drill for the full swing, see the Hip Rotation Drill.

CLEAN CONTACT

Clean Contact - Short Game Drill

Objective:


This short game drill is designed to challenge the golfer to develop precise contact with the golf ball, when playing chip and pitch shots. It’s ideal for that player who tends to contact the turf before the ball on these finesse shots.

The Setup:


Place one Tour Stick on the ground about 15cm (6 inches) behind the golf ball. The Stick should be square to the target line. This drill can be performed with any chipping club.

Safety:


You are likely to contact the Tour Stick with your clubhead on occasion. Ensure that no-one is close by, as the Stick could spin away.
Also, this drill is only for short game shots and not suitable for high-speed swings.

Process:


Take some practice swings first, brushing the grass a few inches after the Tour Stick. Try not to take a divot.
To miss the Stick, you’ll find that the shaft of club needs to be angle forward a few degrees.
Next, hit the chip with the ball placed after the Tour Stick. Strive to brush the grass exactly under the golf ball for Clean Contact.
Always include a target for the shot.

Keep in Mind:


This is to develop a descending angle of approach for your chip, ideal for playing from short grass and tight lies. There are definitely other methods for chipping and pitching, which require a shallow angle of approach.
You might ‘blade’ a few shots or hit the Stick until you improve and become used to the drill.

BUNKER SPLASH

Bunker Splash - Short Game Drill

Objective:


One of the most critical aspects of the bunker shot is the ‘splash’ or divot. To play from the sand successfully, you need to take the right amount of sand with your club and the splash needs to be positioned correctly.
If the divot is too far behind the ball or to big, then much energy is lost. Conversely, if the sand wedge enters the sand too close to the ball or not enough sand is taken, the golf ball is likely to sail over the far side of the green........or crash into the lip of the bunker.

The Setup:


Place both Tour Sticks on the sand, outside the strike zone, parallel to each other, pointing to the player. The Sticks should be apart, by about your shoe size.
The Tour Sticks are generally square to the target line. However, if you’re a player who likes to open the clubface and swing across the target line for a high ‘cut-up‘ shot, you can move the Sticks around to be square to your intended swing path.

Safety:


The Tour Sticks need to be outside the strike zone. For safety, do not try to splash the sand between the Sticks. Place them far enough away, so you won’t hit them with your clubhead.

Process:


Take a few practice swings, splashing the sand. The goal is to enter the sand opposite the first Stick and exit the sand opposite the second Stick, thereby creating a splash mark the length of your shoe.
Next, try the drill with a ball, placing the ball midway between the Sticks. The ball is going to be directly in the middle of your divot.

Keep in Mind:


The size of your ‘Splash’ will change depending upon the texture of the sand. Generally, the softer the sand, the larger the divot. Expect a much smaller divot from firm, compacted lies.

SUBSCRIBERS
8 Lessons

STRIKE DRILLS

POSTURE

Posture - Strike Drill

Objective:


This drill provides excellent feedback for the golfer on Posture in the setup.
By utilising the Tour Stick in a unique manner, a player can develop a step-by-step process to improve Posture.

Setup:


Slide the Tour Stick up under your shirt or sweater, with the Stick running up your spine.
You might need to slide the Stick under your belt to hold it in position.
Take your setup posture as normal.

Safety:


If the Tour Stick is high, with some of it poking above your head, you might touch the Stick in your followthrough.

Process:


Feel your back against the Tour Stick. Take note of which parts of your back are in contact with the Stick and which parts are not.
We all have curved spines. However, most of us can flatten this curvature somewhat to improve our address positions.
Try to touch as much of the Tour Stick as possible with your back. Take your time and go through this process, step by step. You don’t need to touch the Stick with the back of your head.
Take a few swings, resetting your posture in the address position each time.
Try hitting some shots with the Tour Stick in place from your new setup.

Keep in Mind:


This is primarily a drill for the setup but you may feel your posture improve during the golf swing too.

SLIDE STOPPER

Slide Stopper - Strike Drill

Objective:


To promote rotation in the downswing and eliminate excessive’Sliding’ of the hips towards the target.
This drill employs the Tour Stick as a Barrier and provides quality feedback on forward hip position for the player.
Sliding of the hips towards the target can cause an in-to-out swing path.

Setup:


Address the golf ball and take note of where your feet are placed.
Push a Tour Stick vertically, very firmly, into the ground about 5cm (2 inches) outside the position of your forward heel.

Safety:


Be sure to position the Tour Stick low enough and far enough behind you, so there is no danger of contacting the Stick with your hands or club.

Process:


Begin with practice swings, avoiding touch the Tour Stick with either your legs or hips.
You should turn your forward hip ‘inside’ the Stick, thus promoting increased hip rotation and eliminating any Sliding forwards.
Be aware of any contact with the Tour Stick. If there is, slow down the swing until you’re ready to progress.
Once you can swing at normal speed, rotating into the throughswing without touching the Stick, try the exercise with a golf ball.
If you do have a tendency to Slide, then this proves quite challenging. You might need to work through the process slowly again.

Keep in Mind:


If you can’t feel contact with the Tour Stick, use 2 together for more rigid feedback.

STILL HEAD

Still Head - Strike Drill

Objective:


To provide feedback on eyes and head movement for the golfer during the swing.
It’s extremely difficult for a player to feel whether the head moves in the golf swing. This exercise is great for golfers with excessive sway or reverse pivot in the swing.
The drill is quite simple to set up and uses a player’s eyesight and spacial reference for instant feedback.

Setup:


Push a Tour Stick into the ground at a roughly 45° angle, pointing towards you. The top of the Stick will hover approximately 30cm (1 foot) directly over the golf ball.
Address the ball, so that the Tour Stick ‘dissects’ the golf ball from your point of view. Therefore, as you look at ball, the Stick will be covering the very centre of it.

Safety:


Only the tip of Tour Stick needs to cover the golf ball. It should be far enough away that there is no danger of clipping the Stick with your club’s shaft during the swing.

Process:


Begin with practice swings, watching the spot where you intend to brush the grass in your downswing.
If your eyes and head move off the ball or towards the target, then the Tour Stick will appear to move. You will suddenly be able to see the whole golf ball.
Of course, it’s not the Stick moving, it’s your head.

Keep in Mind:


Some great golfers over the years have moved their heads during the swing. All players likely move eyes a little.
It is quite distracting, having the Tour Stick in place, so don’t be surprised if you mishit a few shots when performing this drill.

BALL POSITION CHECK

Ball Position Check - Strike Drill

Objective:


This drill is a favourite among Tour Professionals and for good reason. When golfers have $1,000’s on the line they don’t leave things to chance. They want to be able to setup to the golf ball squarely and consistently, for every shot. Head to a PGA Tour event anywhere in the world and watch the Professionals warm up. You’ll see this setup being utilised up and down the range.

The Setup:


Aim the first Tour Stick at the target, between the player and the golf ball. The second Tour Stick lies on the ground, pointing to the ball, perfectly perpendicular to the first Stick, creating a ‘+’ sign. Address the ball.

Safety:


Ensure that the Tour Sticks are not too close to the golf ball, that you could hit one accidentally.

Process:
This drill provides instant feedback on your ball position at the setup. By hitting golf balls with the Tour Sticks placed, you become comfortable with your desired setup. Any alignment and ball position changes will more easily transfer to on the course.
It’s very easy to fall into bad habits with the ball position, without constant checking. The Tour Pro’s have a distinct advantage over many club golfers, due to this regular monitoring. Their setup is so consistent on the golf course, so their ball striking improves. Imagine playing with a variety of different alignment and ball positions through the round. Pretty challenging but many golfers battle setup consistency every week.

Keep in Mind:


The Tour Sticks must be setup perfectly squarely, using the ball to target line and an exact 90° angle.
The position of the Tour Sticks needs to be monitored regularly. It’s quite easy to kick one and move it while hitting the golf ball.

HEAD BUTT

Head Butt - Strike Drill

Objective:


To provide feedback on movements of the head during the stroke or swing.
The placement of the head against the pool noodle on the Tour Stick, also contributes an incentive to keep the head stable.
This drill is also ideal for many short game strokes, especially putting.

Setup:


Push the Tour Stick deeply into the ground, outside the golf ball, angled towards your head. Slide a pool noodle on top of the Stick.
You might need some adjustment of the ball position and angle of the Tour Stick to obtain the right height.
Address the golf ball normally, resting your forehead against the top of the pool noodle.

Safety:


Ensure that the base of the Tour Stick and pool noodle are far enough away from the golf ball as not to be struck by the golf club.
Wear wraparound sunglasses for optimum eye protection.
Definitely begin with some slow practice swings to adjust to the drill.

Process:


Starting without the golf ball, swing the club whilst maintaining your head’s position, resting against the pool noodle.
You will instantly feel if you come away from the noodle, push against it, sway off or turn your head.
Begin slowly and gradually speed up if you can maintain consistent contact with your head against the noodle.
Next, try the drill with a golf ball.
Definitely, one of the more difficult drills in this series!

Keep in Mind:


Many great golfers have swung the club whilst moving their head. However, if you are struggling with loss of posture or excessive swaying in your stroke or swing, this is the perfect challenge for you.

DIVOT FEEDBACK

Divot Feedback - Strike Drill

Objective:


It’s critical for performance and ball striking improvement, for you to obtain feedback. This feedback drill for irons enhances your awareness of the location and timing of the divot.

Setup:


The Tour Stick is placed on the ground opposite the golf ball, perpendicular to the target.
Although we haven’t here, it’s a good idea to use the 2nd Stick, aimed at the target. This will help align the Stick providing feedback, perfectly square to the target.

Safety:


Make sure both Tour Sticks are far enough away from the ball, so that the there is no danger of striking them with the clubhead.

Process:


Hit the iron shot as normal.
Check the location of your divot or scuff mark. There should be a mark immediately after the original position of the golf ball.
If there is no mark or if the divot is positioned early or later, the strike is poor. Contact can be improved.

Keep in Mind:


This drill provides feedback only and is just the beginning of helping you improve contact and compression of the golf ball.

BALANCE

Balance - Strike Drill

Objective:


The Tour Stick provides feedback for Balance in the address position. Ideally, you’ll be setup to the golf ball, with pressure on your insteps. If your weight drifts towards your toes or heels in the address position, you are not creating your optimum stable platform for the golf swing.

Setup:


Align a Tour Stick parallel to the target, exactly where you intend to stand. You can place the 2nd Tour Stick outside the ball, also parallel to the target.
Address the golf ball, standing on the Tour Stick. The Stick will be directly under the soles of both shoes.

Safety:


Hitting shots while standing on the Tour Stick will challenge your balance and might be slippery.

Process:


Address the golf ball and rock backwards and forwards, to your toes and heels. Balance on your insteps, so that you have equal pressure into the ground, building your most stable setup position.

Keep in Mind:


You can hit shots while standing on the Tour Stick but this drill is primarily for the setup.

ANTI SWAY

Anti Sway - Strike Drill

Objective:


This drill is ideal for that player who’s hips sway excessively away from the target during the backswing.
Although most good players transfer their centre of pressure towards the back foot in the backswing, this weight shift should be created by turning the body behind the ball, creating a more stable platform for the backswing.
Hip sway can often be linked to reverse weight shift and forward spine tilt at the top of the backswing. Forward spine tilt, where the back is angled towards the target, instead of away from it, can be attributed to strain on the lower back and possible injury.

The Setup:


Push a Tour Stick deeply and vertically into the ground, just outside the heel of your trail foot (R foot for right-handers).

Safety:


Ensure that the Tour Stick is deep enough in the ground and far enough behind the swing plane, towards the back heel to avoid being touched by the club or hands in the swing.

Process:


During the golf swing, turn hips inside the Tour Stick, without touching it.
This drill utilises the Tour Stick as a reference point and form of feedback. It encourages rotation, rather than swaying for a safer, more powerful backswing position.

Keep In Mind:


The Tour Stick needs to be firmly in the ground, so you can feel when you touch it.

SUBSCRIBERS
8 Lessons

PLANE DRILLS

PLANE CHECK

Plane Check - Plane Drill

Objective:


To provide feedback on swing plane for the backswing and downswing.
The Tour Stick acts as a pointer, creating more understanding of the position of the golf shaft during the swing.
The pointer provides great feedback on the plane of the swing in both the backswing and downswing.

Setup:


The drill is for practice swings only, we won’t be hitting golf shots while performing the drill
Hold a Tour Stick alongside the club, with the Stick running underneath the club shaft.
If you’re using an old practice club, you can push the Tour Stick into the top of the grip and down into the shaft of your club. There will be some damage to the grip.
Address the golf ball as normal.

Safety:


Do not attempt full shots whilst holding the Tour Stick. Do to the nature of the throughswing, the Stick would likely strike you in the side after impact.

Process:


Swing into the backswing taking note of your shaft plane, using the pointer of the the Stick as your reference
Continue to the top of the backswing, then into the downswing, again watching where the Stick is pointing.
A good starting point is the ball-to-target line. Try to point the Tour Stick along this line in both the backswing and downswing.
The downswing is definitely the most important of these 2 aspects of the swing. More advanced players will try to shallow the shaft plane in the downswing, pointing the Stick outside the ball.
Repeat several times to gain the feeling of your desired swing plane.
Remove the Tour Stick and hit a golf shot, recreating that feeling.

Keep in Mind:


It’s much easier to control the shaft plane when you have such visual feedback and you’re not actually striking the golf ball.
In reality, when striking the golf ball, most find it much more challenging to control the shaft plane.
Overdo the ‘feeling’ you’re after and keep at it!

PLANE BARRIER

Plane Barrier - Plane Drill

Objective:


To provide feedback on the plane of the golf swing. By using the Tour Stick as an incentive to adjust swing plane, adjustments can be made to the plane of the backswing, downswing or throughswing.
This is for golfers who swing too flat or too upright in any section of their swings.

Setup:


Push the Tour Stick firmly into the ground at approximately 60°, matching the lie angle of your club. You can use any golf club you wish.
Slide a pool noodle over the Stick.
There are 4 possible positions for the golf ball, depending on which part of the swing plane you wish to improve.
For backswing and downswing feedback and adjustment, place the ball about 50cm (20 inches) target side of the Tour Stick.
To work on your throughswing (exit plane), place the ball 50cm behind the Stick, so the noodle will impact your club position after impact.
To promote a flatter plane, the Tour Stick will be just outside the ball-to-target line.
For a more upright plane, move the ball, so that the Stick is just inside the ball-to-target line.

Safety:


Do not attempt these Barrier drills with the Tour Stick alone. Use a pool noodle.
Barriers are often struck during drills and golf clubs can break.
Ensure that the Stick and noodle are far enough away from you that you cannot reach them with your hands or arms.

Process:


Begin with practice swings before graduating to slow-motion shots.
Choose which part of your swing you would like to check or adjust. Place the golf ball accordingly.
Attempt to swing without touching the pool noodle.
Start with the golf ball well away from the Barrier and increase the level of difficulty as you become more comfortable with the change in swing plane.
We recommend periodically checking your swing plane with the aid of video for the desired plane.

Keep in Mind:


It’s important to setup the drill correctly with the ideal angle of Tour Stick. This lie angle is unique to you.

INSIDE LOOP

Inside Loop - Plane Drill

Objective:


This plane drill is designed for the golfer who normally swings ‘over the top’.
Players who struggle with this motion, quite often take the club away from the golf ball on the inside. Consequently, the downswing is steep and the path is out-to-in.
The goal of this Plane drill is to reverse that trend and create an Inside Loop.

Setup:


Push the Tour Stick firmly into the ground at an approximate 60° angle. This angle is to match your shaft angle at setup. The Stick is also to be angled away from you.
Slide a pool noodle over the Stick.
The strike area will be about 50cm forward from the base of the Tour Stick.

Safety:


Definitely don’t attempt this drill without a pool noodle. We have witnessed some spectacular breakages of Tour Stick and expensive golf shafts when this has been performed without that protection.
Angle the Stick and noodle away from you, so that your hands and arms cannot reach them during the swing.

Process:


Try this drill without the ball first. Slowly swing the club back, keeping the clubhead and shaft in front of the Tour Stick.
Swing back far enough, so you can allow the club to drop down in the downswing, now passing underneath the Barrier and towards the strike zone.
Complete the followthrough.
This drill is akin to having a small tree in the way and us such, will take some getting used to. Be patient and only increase speed when you are confident of missing the Stick.
When you feel ready to do so, introduce the golf ball. Again, start with slow but full-length swings.
You might hit some push shots initially until you adjust the clubface to produce the desired draw shape.

Keep in Mind:


Due to the extreme in-to-out swing path this drill forces you to produce, the strike is often affected. The shallow club path can cause heavy and thin shots until you get used to the altered clubhead positions.

SHALLOW PLANE

Shallow Plane - Plane Drill

Objective:


To Shallow the Plane of the golf swing in the downswing
For this drill, the Tour Stick isn’t used as a Barrier. It’s used as a guide and incentive to adjust the position of the clubhead.
A steep, vertical shaft in the downswing is one of the most common issues for club golfers today.
This External Focus of Attention is great for promoting a shallow, more powerful approach to the golf ball. It’s great for eliminating that dreaded ‘over the top’ move.

Setup:


Align a Tour Stick parallel to the target line, about 10cm (4inches) from your toes.
Push another Stick into the ground at the back point of the 1st Alignment Stick. Angle it down to match the plane of your shaft at your address position.
This Plane Stick will be positioned slightly behind your backswing/downswing plane. It shouldn’t be so close as to affect your normal swing.
Slide a pool noodle over this Stick.

Safety:


Definitely use a pool noodle for this one - you’re actually going to try to contact the noodle in this exercise.

Process:


Begin without the golf ball.
Very slowly, take your backswing on your normal plane. you are focusing solely on your downswing during this drill.
If you touch the pool noodle with the club in your backswing, head to the Takeaway drills.
Once you reach the top of your backswing, the first move of your transition into the downswing is critical.
As your first move in the downswing, move the clubhead down and behind you, towards the Plane Stick and noodle. Allowing the clubhead to ‘fall’ behind you is one way of achieving this.
Try to slide your club’s shaft along the noodle in the downswing.
Continue slowly towards the hitting zone and into a full finish.
Make several practice swings, sometimes watching the club, sometimes watching the grass where the golf ball would be placed.
When watching the hitting zone, you shouldn’t actually be able to reach the inverted Tour Stick with your club. The idea is to provide just the Intension to slide the club along the noodle.
Keeping to slower speeds, attempt the drill with the golf ball in place. Be patient, you’ll mishit plenty of these.
Repeat several times at slow speeds. It’s important to gain feedback on your downswing plane, either from a friend, coach or video.
Progress to slightly increase speed as you improve.

Keep in Mind:


You’ll likely hit push shots, the occasional hook and plenty of heavy and thin shots whilst attempting this drill. This is due to swinging the club into a very different downswing position, which takes some getting used to.
To build confidence, you can place the ball on a small tee.
If you are pushing most of your shots when performing this drill, you may need to turn more towards the target during the downswing.

TAKEAWAY #1

Takeaway #1 - Plane Drill

Objective:


To promote a Takeaway more ‘in front’ of the golfer.
This drill is ideal for that player who tends to swing the club to the inside and behind them in the backswing.
It can also assist to keep the clubface square in the Takeaway, as golfers who bring the club too far behind them too early in the backswing, also tend to ‘fan’ the clubface open.
The setup utilises the Tour Stick as a Barrier for quality feedback.

Setup:


Push the Tour Stick into the ground at an angle which matches your shaft plane.
Position the Stick so that it is just behind your preferred backswing and downswing Plane.
Slide a pool noodle over the Tour Stick.

Safety:


Always use a pool noodle for this drill, as your golf club break if it contacts the Tour Stick in the downswing.

Process:


Without the golf ball, swing the club into your takeaway.
Keep the club in front of the Tour Stick and stop when the club reaches a point parallel to the ground.
At this point, the shaft of your club should pointing to the target or even slightly left (for right-handers) of the target.
Repeat several times, always avoiding any contact with the pool noodle. It’s important to have the Tour Stick in the relevant position. The drill should be challenging but possible.
Next make some fuller practice swings, again keeping the club in front of the Barrier. If there is any contact, stop, then proceed more slowly.
Progress to hitting some short pitch shots with the Tour Stick in place. If successful in avoiding the Stick, gradually increase the length of the shots.

Keep in Mind:


If an inside Takeaway is quite ingrained in the backswing, then a player may miss the assembly behind, rather than in front of the Stick.
Have a friend check the Takeaway periodically or set up a camera for feedback.

TAKEAWAY #2

Takeaway #2 - Plane Drill

Objective:


This drill works as a checkpoint for the golfer and can be performed at home as well as on the range.
Using the Tour Stick as a guide, this setup provides the player with feedback on the P2 position in the backswing. The goal is to have the club shaft parallel to the target line in the P2 position.
By repeating the exercise many times, a consistent on-plane Takeaway can be developed.

Setup:


Place a Tour Stick on the ground, in line with the heels of your shoes on your backswing side. The Stick should be parallel to the ball to target line.
It’s always a good idea to use an extra Tour Stick as an alignment aid, either between the ball and the player or outside the ball.

Experiment with adjusting the position of the Tour to suit your preference.
Address the ball normally with the club of your choice.

Safety:


No issues.

Process:


Swing the club back to the P2 position and stop. This is the Takeaway position, where the club shaft is parallel to the ground.
Next, look back at the club position, to see if it is over the Tour Stick, which is in line with your heels.
The main goal is have the club shaft parallel to the Stick. The 2nd goal is to make sure the shaft is slightly in front of you.
Repeat several times, checking your P2 position.
Try hitting some shots, repeating the feeling of the Takeaway created by performing the drill.
Have a friend check your Takeaway or use video to ensure that the movement is exactly the same as when you were pausing in P2 for the exercise.
Advanced: Takeaway to P2, check the club’s position over the Tour Stick, return eyes to the ball, continue swing to completion from P2. This is a difficult form of the drill but helps any player become more accustomed to the on-plane Takeaway.

Keep in Mind:


The position of the Tour Stick in line with the heels is a guide only. This position will need personal adjustment, depending upon your height, distance from the ball, posture and preferred Takeaway plane.

TAKEAWAY #3

Takeaway #3 - Plane Drill

Objective:


To connect the arms, club and torso in the Takeaway.
This drill utilises the Tour Stick differently to the 1st 2 Takeaway exercises. The Stick provides instant feedback in the form of feel.
No ball-striking involved with this drill, so perfect for at-home practice.

Setup:


Hold the Tour Stick together with the grip, so that it is underneath the grip and shaft.
If you have an old practice club, you can push the sharp end of the Stick into the top of the grip and down the inside of the club shaft.
Address the golf ball, so that the Stick is running up your body and touching your forward side. You may need to push your grip forward of the ball more than normal.

Safety:


Do not attempt any full swings with the Tour Stick in position, as you will likely strike your forward side with the Stick as you release the club through impact.
This setup is only suitable for the Takeaway, backswing and downswing.

Process:


Swing the club back slowly, keeping the Tour Stick in contact with your lead side.
If you normally have a tendency to Takeaway the club inside and behind you, the Stick will drift away from your body instantly.
If your typical Takeaway is too far outside, you will feel increased pressure of the Tour Stick against your lead side.
Keep the pressure of the Stick against your body light and consistent. Only take the club back as far as parallel to the ground. Beyond that position, the Tour Stick should naturally come away from the body.
Repeat several times, ingraining the feeling of a connected and stable Takeaway.
Try the Takeaway without the Stick in place, recreating the feeling of connection.

Keep in Mind:


It is very easy to fall back into bad old habits as soon as the Tour Stick is removed.
Continue with the drill periodically, as a reminder to you.

LOW HANDLE

Low Handle - Plane Drill

Objective:


To help the player lower the lie angle of the golf club at impact.
This is for golfers who tend to get steep in their swing and hit the golf ball with a high shaft and grip position at impact.
This High Handle produces a toe-down divot and adversely affects ballstriking.
There should be little to no difference in lie angle from the address to the impact position.

Setup:


Push a Tour Stick firmly into the ground, well outside the position of the golf ball, at a very low angle. Slide a pool noodle over the Stick.
A small section of the noodle will hover over the ball, either just in front or just behind it (so you can still see the ball).

Safety:


Definitely perform this drill only with a pool noodle. There is a very high chance of contact and golf clubs have been known to break when hitting a Tour Stick.

Process:


Begin with some practice swings and then some pitch shots.
You are using the Tour Stick and pool noodle as a Barrier and you are simply attempting to hit the golf ball without touching the noodle.
Keep a close eye on any divots you make. The goal is for nice, flat marks, rather than the toe-deep divots, which are very common amongst golfers.
Have a friend check the difficulty level of this drill. You can make it harder to perform successfully by moving the ball further under the noodle.
Slowly increase the speed of your swings, until you can hit full shots without touching the pool noodle.

Keep in Mind:


Many golfers strike the ball from the toe of the clubhead, in an effort to miss the pool noodle.
Gain feedback on your ballstriking, by using face tape or tees either side of the golf ball.

SUBSCRIBERS

RAILWAY TRACKS

Railway Tracks - Accuracy Drill

Objective:


To improve clubface aim and alignment of the feet in the golf setup.
Popular on Tour, this drill utilises 2 Pro Sticks and ensures the player sets up to the golf ball squarely and consistently. It should be a part of every golfer’s practice routine.


The Setup:


Place a Pro Stick outside the position of the golf ball, aiming directly at the target. The 2nd Pro Stick should run parallel to the 1st, alongside your toes. This ‘inside’ Stick won’t point directly at the target, but slightly to the side, exactly parallel to the 1st Stick.

Safety:


When setting up, ensure that the outside Tour Stick isn’t too close to the ball. There should be no risk of the clubhead striking either Stick.

Process:


Ideal for improving your setup with any golf club in the bag. Hit several shots, ensuring that you are using both Tour Sticks to align yourself to the target squarely and consistently.
Quite often, a golfer will feel misaligned when using the Sticks as a reference, but with regular practice, the player will become more comfortable with the improved alignment.
Mix it up by changing targets regularly.

Keep In Mind:


Each of your shoes needs to be exactly the same distance away from the inside Tour Stick, to ensure a parallel alignment.
Many golfers think they are parallel to the target but aren’t taking enough notice of the alignment aids.
When addressing the golf ball, stand far enough away from this Stick to avoid kicking and displacing it.

INSIDE APPROACH

Inside Approach - Accuracy Drill

Objective:


A classic ‘Slice Correction’ drill. For the golfer who ‘comes over the top’ in the downswing. This drill promotes a more ‘in-to-out’ swing path, promoting a draw.
By using the Tour Stick as a barrier, it acts as a wonderful incentive to adjust the position of the club in the downswing.
Of course, if the clubhead touches the Stick in the downswing, this provides instant feedback on swing path.

Setup:


Suspend the Tour Stick through a range basket or similar.
Place the basket behind the ball, as much outside the ball to target line as possible. The Stick should be aimed towards the target, with just the tip balanced above the golf ball.

Safety:


Use your own basket, we wouldn’t want you breaking Driving Range equipment!
With these types of ‘Barrier’ drills, the Tour Stick is often struck by the club, so ensure no-one is close by.
You can slide a section of pool noodle over the end of the Stick for added safety.

Process:


Beginning without the ball, simply make some swings without touching the barrier. Try to brush the section of grass underneath the tip of the Tour Stick.
To achieve this, you will need to approach the hitting area from the inside with the club.
Next, try hitting a golf ball.....VERY SLOWLY! If you normally slice or pull shots, swinging out-to-in, then you will probably hit the Barrier, at least until you’ve had some practice.
Whilst performing the drill, you might hit some push shots to start, indicating an in-to-out swing path. Great! You’ll need to learn how to close the clubface a little during your swing to achieve that draw.
Be patient and master the drill slowly before speeding up your swing gradually.

Keep in Mind:


In an attempt to miss the Barrier in the drill, you may strike the ball from the toe of the golf club.

SWING PATH

Swing Path - Accuracy Drill

Objective:


A clever drill utilising an External Focus of Attention to correct or adjust the swing path of the clubhead through impact.
This drill can be used by the golfer trying to correct a slice or a hook. It can also be used to ‘teach’ a player to draw or fade the ball.

The Setup:


Place the 1st Tour Stick outside the golf ball, aligned to the target. This Stick doesn’t move.
The 2nd Tour Stick is placed on the ground, midway between your feet and the ball. This 2nd Pro Stick will be aligned either open or closed to the target, depending upon the desired Swing Path adjustment.
For an intended draw or to correct an out-to-in Swing Path, aim the 2nd, inside Stick slightly to the right for a right-handed golfer (left for left-handed). Align the Stick to the left (for a right-hander) if the desired shot shape is a fade or if you are correcting a draw or hook, caused by an in-to-out Swing Path.

Safety:


Both Tour Sticks should be far enough away from the golf ball, as to not be in danger of being struck by the clubhead.

Process:


Begin without the golf ball.
Choose your intended swing path. To promote an in-to-out Swing Path, aim the inside Tour Stick closed (to the right of target for right-handers, left for left-handers).
Track your takeaway slowly along the outside Stick, regardless of the intended Swing Path or shot shape.
In transition, allow the club to drop to the inside and swing through the impact zone, with the clubhead now tracking along the inside Tour Stick, swinging on the intended in-to-out path.
Gradually build up until you reach full speed, always looping the transition into the downswing to achieve the desired Swing Path.
Introduce the golf ball but revert to the slow-motion swing. Only increase clubhead speed if you maintain
the preferred Swing Path.
The flight of the golf ball is key for identifying success and video playback offers enhanced feedback.
For an out-to-in Swing Path or to promote a fade shot, change the position of the inside Tour Stick to an open position (aiming left for right-handers).

GUNBARREL

Gunbarrel - Accuracy Drill

Objective:


To hit shots straighter. This setup encourages improved clubface alignment and a more neutral swing path.
This results in more accurate shots to the target, with less draw or fade curvature to the flight of the golf ball.
This drill can be performed with any club in the bag.

Setup:


Place 2 Tour Sticks on the ground, either side of the golf ball. Position your clubhead behind the ball. Leave enough space from the Sticks on each side of your club, so that you are confident that you won’t hit them.

Safety:


Start with plenty of space between the Tour Sticks. You can bring them closer together, as you improve.

Process:
Begin with a few practice swings, brushing the grass between the Tour Sticks. Take particular notice of your swing path and the direction of any divots. We are striving for a neutral swing path for this drill.
Then proceed with hitting golf shots with any club. The golf ball is giving you the required feedback. See how straight you can hit your shots. This will be more challenging with the longer clubs, due to reduced loft and backspin.

Keep in Mind:


A perfectly straight shot is quite a challenge. If you generally curve the ball one way, you might feel like you are attempting the opposite flight to achieve that dead straight shot.

THE GATE

The Gate - Accuracy Drill

Objective:


To challenge the golfer to hit the golf ball straighter, using an External Focus of Attention.
This drill is scalable, depending on the skill level of the player. There is no technical instruction involved, it’s a purely task-led exercise.
Ideal for use with any club in the bag and perfect for competitive practice.

Setup:


Push 2 Tour Sticks into the ground, 4-5 metres in front of the golf ball. The Sticks should be about 30cm apart, depending on skill level. Make sure they are placed either side of the ball to the target line for The Gate.
To make the drill easier, bring the Tour Sticks closer to the ball and further apart.
For a real challenge, extend the distance from the golf ball and narrow The Gate.

Safety:
Always cover the Tour Sticks with pool noodles, as they will splinter or break if struck by a golf ball at high speed.
Angle the Sticks away from you, so that if the ball does strike a pool noodle the deflection will be upwards.
The Tour Sticks should be at least 4 metres (4 yards) from you and make sure no-one is in range of any deflections.

Process:


Using the club of your choice, hit a shot at your target, attempting to fly the ball through the Gate.
Listen and watch for contact with either pool noodle.
This is instant quality feedback for launch direction and shape of shot.
Repeat until proficient performing the task. Adjust the level of difficulty, so that the drill is challenging but possible.
Make a game of it, setting yourself goals. It’s a good idea to record scores and revisit the challenge at a later time. Always strive to improve your scores.
You can include a shot shape element to the challenge, by moving The Gate to either side of the ball to target line.

Keep in Mind:


This drill is only suitable for mid to long irons and woods. Wedges would likely fly too high and carry over the pool noodles.

SHOT SHAPE

Shot Shape - Accuracy Drill

Objective:


To challenge the player to develop control of the ball flight.
This exercise is a simple constraint-based drill, perfect for group training or more creative practice sessions.
The player is tasked with curving shots both ways.

Setup:


Push the Tour Stick vertically, about 5 metres (5.5 yards) in front of your golf ball.
The Stick needs to be directly between the golf ball and the target.
Slide a pool noodle over the Tour Stick.
This drill can be performed with almost any club but isn’t suited to the wedges.

Safety:


The Tour Stick should not be too close to the ball at setup, a few metres at least away from the strike point.
Definitely always use a pool noodle for this challenge, as the ball can split or break the Stick quite easily.

Process:
Choosing any club, play a draw or fade shot around the pool noodle, attempting to miss the Stick to the side and then curve back to the target.
Next curve the ball in the opposite direction, again trying to finish on target.
Repeat several times.
Most golfers will find one shape easier than the other. It’s good practice to spend more time working on the more challenging shape, developing weaknesses into strengths.
Change clubs often.

Keep in Mind:


If hitting a more lofted club, you might need to move a little closer to the Tour Stick, as your ball will likely fly over the pool noodle.

SQUARE CLUBFACE

Square Clubface - Accuracy Drill

Objective:


To build a consistent setup routine, ensuring the correct aiming of the clubface to the target.
Most drills using Alignment Sticks focus on feet and body alignment. This unique setup is the most effective way of squaring the clubface in the address position.
The direction of a golf shot is largely determined by the angle of the clubface, so it is critical to start with the clubface square.
This drill can be used with any club in the bag, including the putter.

Setup:


Using 2 Tour Sticks, set them up in a ‘T’ formation. Place the 1st Stick on the ground, just outside the golf ball, aiming at the target.
The 2nd Tour Stick runs perpendicularly to the 1st Stick, outside it, away from you.
This 2nd, Square Tour Stick is aligned immediately behind the ball, directly in line with your clubface.

Safety:


Both Tour Sticks should be far enough away from the golf ball so that there is no danger of striking the with the clubhead.

Process:


Setup is key here. However, the process will differ from irons to woods.
Irons: Address the golf ball with the clubhead, ensuring that the leading bottom edge of the clubhead is perfectly in line with the 2nd Stick. Some irons have paint in the bottom groove to assist the aiming process.
This may not feel like you are setting up with a Square Clubface. As long as the Tour Sticks are placed perfectly, and the leading edge of your iron is exactly matched to the Tour Sticks, then you must be set up squarely.
Hit several shots to your target, allowing yourself to become accustomed to being perfectly square.
Woods (& Hybrids): Address the ball as with the iron. However, this time, the top edge of your wood should be in line with the Square Tour Stick.
Yes, we know.......confusing, right?
Irons and woods are constructed completely differently, so we need to be fully aware of the aiming differences of each club.

Keep In Mind:


The 2nd Pro Stick must be placed EXACTLY 90° from the 1st Stick, for a perfect setup.

INTERMEDIATE TARGET

Intermediate Target - Accuracy Drill

Objective:


To enhance clubface alignment and improve accuracy. This drill is an alignment aid but it’s also much more than that. The Intermediate Target drill utilises the Pro Sticks to develop a consistent and effective pre-shot routine, as well as building confidence.

The Setup:


One Pro Stick is simply placed on the ground, along the toes of the golfer, parallel to the target line.
The focus, however, is on the 2nd Pro Stick, which is directly on the ball-to-target line, about a metre (3 feet) in front of the golf ball. This Stick is aligned perfectly to the target.

Safety:


Place the Intermediate Target Stick far enough away from the golf ball, so that a ‘thinned’ or topped shot will still fly over the top of it.
Also, ensure no one is within range of a ricocheted golf ball.

Process:


Address the golf ball, making sure the clubface is aiming perfectly towards the Tour Stick and the target.
This is a form of ‘Block’ practice. Strike plenty of practice balls, attempting to fly each one directly over the Intermediate Target.

Keep in Mind:


To begin with, you might feel like you’re aiming left or right of the target when addressing the ball, despite the Tour Stick being positioned exactly.
This is quite common and perfectly normal. This drill helps you to become more comfortable with square clubface alignment.

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